Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering 2020

2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering now open for nominations

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Nominations for the 2021 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering (QEPrize) – one of the world’s most prestigious engineering accolades – has opened around the world, with winners to be announced in February next year.

Now entering its fifth cycle, the £1m prize awarded every two years seeks nominations from around the world that celebrate innovations across all sectors of engineering.

The QEPrize is awarded to up to five engineers responsible for a groundbreaking engineering innovation which is of global benefit to humanity.

Today’s call for nominations coincides with the 94th birthday of Her Madge, who graciously gave her name to the prize when it was established in 2011.

Lord Browne of Madingley, chairman of the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation, said: “Engineering transforms the very best of human imagination and creativity into tangible products, processes and services that benefit the lives of billions.

“It is the platform on which society is built, and the most powerful tool we have at our disposal to solve collective challenges.”

“In the midst of the current global health crisis, engineers are creating new medicines and healthcare equipment; maintaining critical infrastructure for key workers and supply chains; and enhancing digital services to accommodate rapid changes to the way in which we learn, communicate and do business.

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“The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering exists to celebrate the critical role that engineering plays in society, as well as those who have changed the world through their engineering innovation.”

This year’s nominations window will remain open until 17 July 2020, before an independent and international judging panel of leading experts will then assess the nominations, and the winner(s) will be announced in February 2021.

The only limitations are that self-nomination and posthumous nomination are not allowed – fire off your nominations here.


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